Author Topic: Cutting Aether for Wireless  (Read 4413 times)

Offline basis21b

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Cutting Aether for Wireless
« on: August 23, 2010, »
I am doing the work to prepare the light fixtures to accept Aether boards once I get them built.  What I need are recommendations on what I could use to make the cuts in the case to accommodate the EX/RX antenna.  The assembly video did not give any ideas and obviously I need to be spoon-fed.

Tom B

Offline tbone321

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Re: Cutting Aether for Wireless
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2010, »
I would use a hole saw to cut the antenna opening.  Size it slightly larger than the antenna and make sure to get one that cuts metal as well as wood.  I would wait on making this modification to the housing until after you build at least 1 Ather to make sure that you are putting the hole in the correct location.
If at first you don't succeed,
your not cut out for sky diving

Offline RJ

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Re: Cutting Aether for Wireless
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2010, »
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I am doing the work to prepare the light fixtures to accept Aether boards once I get them built.  What I need are recommendations on what I could use to make the cuts in the case to accommodate the EX/RX antenna.  The assembly video did not give any ideas and obviously I need to be spoon-fed.



 The hole is made with a small 3/16"regular drill bit.  I will attach a drawing for reference.  All that stick through it is the RF modules antenna. The large pcb stays inside.

Look at my rough sketch.

RJ

Innovation beats imitation - and it's more satisfying

Offline tbone321

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Re: Cutting Aether for Wireless
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2010, »
If 3/4 is what is needed then I will probably try it with a 3/4 bi-metal hole saw since I have them and it will make it much faster for me.   
If at first you don't succeed,
your not cut out for sky diving

Offline bisquit476

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Re: Cutting Aether for Wireless
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2010, »
You could also try using a dremel tool with a small whiz wheel (cutoff tool). Final fit can be done with a jewelers file.

Offline RJ

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Re: Cutting Aether for Wireless
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2010, »
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If 3/4 is what is needed then I will probably try it with a 3/4 bi-metal hole saw since I have them and it will make it much faster for me.   

You do not want a 3/4 hole!

You want a 3/16" slit 3/4 of an inch long.

RJ
Innovation beats imitation - and it's more satisfying

Offline tbone321

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Re: Cutting Aether for Wireless
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2010, »
I guess that my question would be exactly what difference does it make?  A 3/4 inch PVC pipe cap will cover a 3/4 hole as easily as it will cover a 3/16 by 3/4 inch slot and being that the hole is being drilled in a flat panel in the middle of the top of the fixture, I don't think that the single large hole would cause any structural issues. I understand that a hole is not required and if the opening were exposed there would be no discussion as a slot sized to the antenna would look far more professional than a large hole of the same width as the slot but since the opening is going to be covered with a PVC cap that will not be removable, I just don't see the need for the extra work.  Not everyone has the same skill level with tools and while some may find it easy creating a slot in the case others will not.  Drilling a single hole is something that just about anyone can do.  If there is a reason that a hole will not work then please let me know so that I can get that idea out of my head and set up to start making slots and thank you for all of the great stuff that you have designed so far.  You have open up a whole new world for me with affordable light automation.
If at first you don't succeed,
your not cut out for sky diving